Can’t get enough Dr. Sean B. Carroll? Here’s more!

Brian and I are at the NSTA Regional conference in Milwaukee. The conference kicks off with the presentation of a proclamation that makes this week “Science Education Week” as declared by Milwaukee’s Mayor Tom Barrett. Milwaukee's mayor sends proclamation: it's "Science Education Week!" pic.twitter.com/B6SRpSX1o1 — Lab Out Loud (@laboutloud) November 9, 2017 Next up was a presentation from Wisconsin’s own […]

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Learning the Rules with Sean B. Carroll

To close season 10, we welcome back Dr. Sean B. Carroll – award-winning scientist, writer, and educator.  Dr. Carroll’s new book, The Serengeti Rules, examines the fundamental question of how life works as he uncovers the rules that determine the what controls the number of species in an environment and the diversity within that community.  What this molecular biologist learns […]

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Dr. Carin Bondar: Using Sex to Teach Biological Concepts

This week we talk sex with Dr. Carin Bondar (specifically, we discuss how science teachers can use sex to teach biological concepts).  As biologist, writer and presenter, Dr. Carin Bondar hosts an independent web series called Wild Sex and has just released her second book, also titled Wild Sex.  Listen to the show to hear ideas on how you might utilize biological sex to teach […]

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Pokémon GO: Has Your Science Classroom Evolved with the Phenomenon?

As students are returning to school, they might be hunting for Pokémon with the wildly popular PokémonGo app. Part of the game allows students students to evolve their Pokémon into other pocket monsters. But is this an accurate portrayal of biological evolution? Can science educators actually use PokémonGo to teach evolution or other scientific concepts? To help answer some of these questions, we are happy to welcome Dr. […]

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Visualizing Molecular Structure and Function with Art

Our guest this week is scientist and artist Dr. David Goodsell.  As Associate Professor at the Scripps Research Institute, Dr. Goodsell splits his time on research and science outreach.  His science outreach includes artwork featured online, in a variety of media and even in science museums.  Listen to the show to learn how Dr. Goodsell makes his art, how accurate […]

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Using Science Journalism in the Classroom with @majohnso

This week we welcome journalist Mark Johnson to the show.  As medical and science journalist for the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, researching and communicating science to the public is the core of Mark’s work.  Excelling in long form journalism, Mark shared the 2011 Pulitzer Prize for One In A Billion: A Boy’s Life, a Medical Mystery. Mark joins us to tell us about his experiences […]

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Episode 112: Science and Politics – GMOs in Hawaii

This week we welcome journalist Amy Harmon to Lab Out Loud.  Harmon recently wrote an article for the NY Times in which she examined a county council in Hawaii that wanted to ban genetically modified organisms.  Listen to the show as Harmon unravels the intersection of politics and science in this heated debate, and you will discover many resources that […]

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Episode 111: Watching the History Inside You with Your Inner Fish

This week we welcome Neil Shubin to the show.  As paleontologist and anatomy professor at the University of Chicago, Shubin has had some fantastic opportunities to hunt for fossils and use them to communicate stories of our own evolution. In 2008, he wrote these stories into Your Inner Fish – a national bestselling book that has now been adapted into a three-part series […]

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One Hecto-sode: 100 Episodes Promoting Science Education

For our 100th episode, we welcome Glenn Branch to the show.  As Deputy Director for the National Center for Science Education, Glenn talks to us about the center, how they support climate change education, and how the NCSE can defend science in your classroom. Lab Out Loud thanks NSTA and our listeners for support of 100 episodes. Listen to how we […]

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Episode 97 – The Focus Microscope Camera for iPad

Our guest this week is Exo Labs CTO and co-founder, Jeff Stewart. As a new startup in science education, Exo Labs recently released their Focus microscope camera and iPad App. Replacing the eyepiece on any standard microscope, the Focus camera streams a high quality image to the iPad screen where it can be recorded and shared. Jeff talks to us […]

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Episode 94 – Pick Your Poison

We catch up this week with Deborah Blum.  Blum first joined us on Periodicity to talk about science journalism.  Since then, Blum has written “The Poisoner’s Handbook: Murder and the Birth of Forensic Medicine in Jazz Age New York.”  Blum talks to us about poisons, forensic medicine, and literacy in the science classroom. Links Deborah Blum deborahblum.com Speakeasy Science Wired […]

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Episode 90 – Looking at Our DNA with 23andMe

http://traffic.libsyn.com/wsst/LOL90.mp3 To prepare for this week’s episode, Dale and I had to do some homework: spit into a tube.  Carrying our DNA, this tube was mailed to 23andMe for analysis.  Now that we have our results, we were able to talk with Emily Drabant – a research community manager (with a PhD in neuroscience) at 23andMe.  Emily talks to us about 23andMe, how […]

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Episode 84 – The Science of Good Cooking

http://traffic.libsyn.com/wsst/LOL84.mp3 This week we talk with Guy Crosby about “The Science of Good Cooking” – written by Crosby and the editors of America’s Test Kitchen. As science editor for America’s Test Kitchen, Crosby advises the science content in Cook’s Illustrated magazine, Cook’s Country, and the popular PBS television cooking show “America’s Test Kitchen”. Crosby talks to us about the science […]

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Episode 83 – Sam Kean’s Stories from the Human Genome

http://traffic.libsyn.com/wsst/LOL83.mp3 After the summer release of “The Violinist’s Thumb and Other Lost Tales of Love, War, and Genius, As Written By Our Genetic Code,” we got a chance to catch up with science writer Sam Kean.  Sam talks to us about his book, science writing, and how educators might use his stories in the science classroom. Did you read any good […]

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Episode 79 – Vernier’s Game-Changer

http://traffic.libsyn.com/wsst/LOL79.mp3 Our guest this week is the co-founder of Vernier Software & Technology, David Vernier.  David talks to us about the history of the company, his popular software and data collection hardware, and the release of two new products that are part of Vernier’s Connected Science System – the LabQuest2 and Graphical Analysis iOS app. Links: Vernier Software & Technology About […]

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Episode 77 – Gaming for Science

http://traffic.libsyn.com/wsst/LOL77.mp3 Our guest this week is Zoran Popović.  As director for the Center for Game Science at the University of Washington, Zoran helped create (with David Baker and Seth Cooper) Foldit – a popular online game that teaches protein folding and ultimately allows scientists to discover protein structures through crowdsourcing and community collaboration.  Zoran talks to us about Foldit and using games to help solve […]

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There’s a Zombie in my Classroom

This week we talk with Dr. Steven Schlozman, Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and Lecturer in Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education.  Schlozman talks to us about his start in teaching, his recent book “The Zombie Autopsies: Secret Notebooks from the Apocalypse” and how to use zombies to teach science. Links: The Zombie Autopsies “The Zombie […]

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Episode 73 – NCSE Now Defending Climate Change Education

http://traffic.libsyn.com/wsst/LOL73.mp3 As science educators are increasingly reporting attacks on climate change education, the National Center for Science Education (NCSE) is announcing that they will also be defending climate change science in public school science education.  Join us as Dr. Eugenie Scott explains this new initiative for NCSE by adding climate change to their portfolio in defending good science education. Links: […]

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Episode 72 – 2011 Science Breakthroughs of the Year

http://traffic.libsyn.com/wsst/LOL72.mp3 To kick off the new year, we invited Pamela Hines , senior editor at Science, to talk with us about science in 2011.  From the farthest reaches of the universe to the deepest mysteries of the cell, Hines highlights the major science breakthroughs of 2011. Listen to the episode to hear about these discoveries, and what we might expect […]

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