Learn Science with Che[M]ystery – a Science Graphic Novel

To kickoff season 11, we welcome Christopher Preece to the show.  As a high school chemistry teacher, Chris recently created Che[M]ystery – a graphic novel that teaches chemistry concepts. Written by Preece and illustrated by Josh Reynolds, Che[M]ystery follows the adventures of two kids as they gain superpowers, fight a radioactive monster and learn some science along the way. Chris joins us to discuss […]

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Episode 103 – Reimagining the Chemistry Set

Imagine the chemistry set of the 21st century.  That’s the idea behind a new competition.  SPARK, The Science Play and Research Kit competition, is a project of the Society for Science & the Public, in collaboration with the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation.  To tell us more about the competition, we contacted Janet Coffey – program officer for science learning at […]

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Episode 94 – Pick Your Poison

We catch up this week with Deborah Blum.  Blum first joined us on Periodicity to talk about science journalism.  Since then, Blum has written “The Poisoner’s Handbook: Murder and the Birth of Forensic Medicine in Jazz Age New York.”  Blum talks to us about poisons, forensic medicine, and literacy in the science classroom. Links Deborah Blum deborahblum.com Speakeasy Science Wired […]

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Episode 79 – Vernier’s Game-Changer

http://traffic.libsyn.com/wsst/LOL79.mp3 Our guest this week is the co-founder of Vernier Software & Technology, David Vernier.  David talks to us about the history of the company, his popular software and data collection hardware, and the release of two new products that are part of Vernier’s Connected Science System – the LabQuest2 and Graphical Analysis iOS app. Links: Vernier Software & Technology About […]

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Episode 78 – “Hunting the Elements” and other resources from NOVA

http://traffic.libsyn.com/wsst/LOL78.mp3 In anticipation of NOVA’s upcoming “Hunting the Elements” special and app, we got in touch with Rachel Connolly – NOVA’s Director of Education.  Rachel talks to us about the show and its accompanying app, NOVA’s Hunting the Elements periodic tweets, and other resources from NOVA.  Listen to the show and watch “Hunting the Elements”, airing 4/4/12 on PBS. Links: Hunting […]

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Lab Out Loud is Changing!

For almost three and a half years, Lab Out Loud has been providing shows that discuss science news and science education by interviewing leading scientists, researchers, science writers and other important figures in the field. However, we have always wrestled with the fact that we were not being true to the title of our show. Many of our listeners have […]

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Episode 56 – More Chemistry Videos from the PTOV

http://traffic.libsyn.com/wsst/LOL56.mp3   To kick off the International Year of Chemistry, we talk with Dr. Martyn Poliakoff and Dr. Samantha Tang from The Periodic Table of Videos.  Having completed all videos for all 118 elements, the team is working on updating every element video, while adding other videos such as molecular videos and chemical definition videos.  Drs. Poliakoff and Tang talk […]

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Episode 52 – Science We Can Read About

http://traffic.libsyn.com/wsst/LOL52.mp3     This week we discuss our favorite science books and talk to author Sam Kean. Sam discusses the periodic table, scientific discovery and storytelling in his new book The Disappearing Spoon: And Other True Tales of Madness, Love, and the History of the World from the Periodic Table of the Elements.  What science books do you read? Join […]

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Episode 37 – Science Because We Can

http://media.libsyn.com/media/wsst/LOL37.mp3   Our guest this week has some serious accolades that would make any geek proud: he has won an Ig Nobel prize (2002), been referenced in a Foxtrot comic, and owns the domain name periodictable.com.  Dr. Theo Gray talks to us this week about his tables, science experiments and safety, Wolfram Alpha, and even answers some student questions. Links: […]

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Episode 23 – The Periodic Table of Videos

http://media.libsyn.com/media/wsst/LOL23.mp3   Our second international podcast brings us to the University of Nottingham, where The Periodic Table of Videos is hosted.  An online periodic table that includes short videos about each element, the PTOV has been watched over 3.9 million times.  Dr. Martyn Poliakoff, CBE – a research professor at the University of Nottingham – tells us about The Periodic […]

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Episode 22 – When Good Chemicals Go Bad

http://media.libsyn.com/media/wsst/LOL22.mp3   In this episode, Maryann Suero and Ken Roy warn us of safety dangers lurking in schools – both in the science lab and beyond.  Dr. Suero is the Children’s Health Program Manager for the EPA Region 5 (Midwest Region), and Ken Roy is the Director of Environmental Health and Safety for Glastonbury Public Schools in CT, the Safety […]

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Subscribe to Flinn Safety Training Notes

Each month, Flinn Scientific provides “Science Department Safety Training Notes”.  This month’s notes are “Safety Guidelines for Chemical Demonstrations.” From Flinn: Chemical demonstrations can produce attention-grabbing results that dramatically illustrate chemistry in action–from making fountains of foam to creating kaleidoscopic colors, and generating flashes of fire. This month’s safety training reminds you that safety must always come first by providing important […]

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Episode 17 – Sir Harold Kroto on Science Education

http://media.libsyn.com/media/wsst/LOL17.mp3 To open our second season, we talked with Sir Harold Kroto. Kroto won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1996 (along with Curl and Smalley) for the discovery of fullerenes. He talks to us about a loss of hands-on experiences in our world, how to reform science education, and offers a new resource for science (and other) educators. Links: […]

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Episode 11 – Death of the Chemistry Set

http://media.libsyn.com/media/wsst/nstalol11.mp3 This week we talk with Steve Silberman, contributing editor for Wired Magazine. Steve talks to us about the demise of the chemistry set (as related to his article Don’t Try this at Home) and what that might mean for the future of scientific curiosity in our children. Preview from the Show: In the last few years, a kind of […]

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