Creating Next Generation Scientists with ExploraVision

  Do your students have a vision for the future? Then they might be motivated to enter the 23rd Annual Toshiba/NSTA annual ExploraVision competition. Through problem solving, critical thinking and communication skills, this K-12 science competition encourages students to imagine and explore a vision of a technology 20 years into the future.  To help explain what ExploraVision is and how to participate, we welcome Arthur Eisenkraft (Professor of […]

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Teachable Moments and other Seismology Resources from IRIS

Our guests this week come from IRIS – the  Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology.  Michael Hubenthal (senior education specialist) and John Taber (Director of Education and Public Outreach) join us to talk about the educational opportunities in seismology and earth science available from IRIS.  Listen to the show to learn how you can use IRIS’s recent earthquake teachable moments, earthquake browser, and how you can search […]

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Science NetLinks, Active Explorer and other Resources from AAAS

Many science teachers will recognize that AAAS (the American Association for the Advancement of Science) publishes the respected peer-reviewed journal Science.  As the world’s largest general scientific society, AAAS also promotes science literacy with the goal that all students receive a high-quality science education.  That’s why we are delighted to welcome Suzanne Thurston and Maria Sosa (both from the AAAS Directorate […]

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Leading With Awesome: How to Make a Good Science Video

As we have been talking about science videos lately, we decided to investigate what it takes to make a good science video.  So we invited Derek Muller, creator and host of Veritasium: An Element of Truth to the show. Veritasium is a YouTube channel of science and engineering videos featuring experiments, interviews, demos, and other cool science topics.  Derek joins us to talk […]

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Sal Khan explains the Breakthrough Junior Challenge

To kick off season nine of Lab Out Loud, we welcome Sal Khan to the show.  As founder of The Khan Academy, Sal is encouraging students age 13-18 to submit a 10-minute video to the Breakthrough Junior Challenge.  Presented by The Breakthrough Prize and The Khan Academy, The Breakthrough Junior Challenge is currently seeking innovative videos from students that explain a challenging concept or theory of mathematics, life sciences, […]

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Good Thinking! from Smithsonian Science Education Center

  From the Smithsonian Science Education Center, we welcome Marjee Chmiel (Associate Director of Curriculum and Communications) and Jean Flanagan (Science Education Research Specialist) to showcase Good Thinking!  – a new animated series that explores topics in science, cognition, and pedagogy.  Using peer-reviewed research, Good Thinking! addresses common student misconceptions with short, animated episodes specifically geared towards science educators. Listen to the episode to find out more about Good […]

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Easy, Mobile Measurement with @ThePocketLab

To close our eighth season at Lab Out Loud, we welcome Clifton Roozeboom to the show.  We first met Clifton at the NSTA 2015 Conference in Chicago, where we noticed his company – The PocketLab.  Built to be a small, rugged wireless sensor platform, the PocketLab can measure acceleration, force, angular velocity, magnetic field, pressure, altitude, and temperature while simultaneously reporting to a device […]

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Make Collaborative, Beautiful Graphs with Plot.ly

Inspired by a session at the NSTA 2015 Conference in Chicago, we talk with Plot.ly founder and COO Matt Sundquist.  As a relatively young graphing program, Plot.ly makes it easy to collaboratively analyze and visualize data.  Matt talks to us about Plot.ly, how it can be used in the science classroom, and how you can even import real data into this […]

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Using the Claim, Evidence and Reasoning Framework

Prompted from listener feedback, we welcome Dr. Kate McNeill and Dr. Joe Krajcik to the show.  As authors of Supporting Grade 5-8 Students in Constructing Explanations in Science, Kate and Joe join us to talk about using the Claim, Evidence and Reasoning (CER) framework as a method to guide students towards explanations in science.  Listen to the show to understand what CER is […]

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Science in Upcoming State Legislation, Conference Recap

Our guest this week is John Timmer, senior science editor for Ars Technica.  John has been paying particular attention to state legislatures that, in the first few month of each year, tend to propose bills that attempt to dictate how science is taught in their schools.  Listen to the show to hear what bills might affect teaching science in your state. […]

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Follow #NGSSChat on Twitter

Have you wanted to reach out to other science teachers with your questions about NGSS?  Our guests this week can help.  Using Twitter, Fred Ende and Tricia Shelton moderate #NGSSchat – an online forum to learn and share around the Next Generation Science Standards and great science teaching.  Listen to the show to find out how you can “lurk”, learn and […]

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The Illustrated Women in Science with @CountDvL

Continuing our exploration of art in science, we invite author, illustrator and math/science teacher Dale Debakcsy to the show.  Every two weeks, Debakcsywrites and illustrates about important women in science.  Now that he has now completed half of his two-year project, Debakcsy has compiled the first 26 portraits into a book called The Illustrated Women in Science: Year One.  Listen to the […]

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Visualizing Molecular Structure and Function with Art

Our guest this week is scientist and artist Dr. David Goodsell.  As Associate Professor at the Scripps Research Institute, Dr. Goodsell splits his time on research and science outreach.  His science outreach includes artwork featured online, in a variety of media and even in science museums.  Listen to the show to learn how Dr. Goodsell makes his art, how accurate […]

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Crash Course Astronomy with @BadAstronomer

The Bad Astronomer (a.k.a. Phil Plait) has been busy since we’ve last had him on Lab Out Loud.  As astronomer, public speaker, science evangelizer, and author, Phil can now add YouTube host to his resume.  Working with Hank and John Green (Crash Course) and PBS Digital Studios, Phil has been writing and filming a new series on YouTube called Crash Course Astronomy.  Listen […]

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Using Science Journalism in the Classroom with @majohnso

This week we welcome journalist Mark Johnson to the show.  As medical and science journalist for the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, researching and communicating science to the public is the core of Mark’s work.  Excelling in long form journalism, Mark shared the 2011 Pulitzer Prize for One In A Billion: A Boy’s Life, a Medical Mystery. Mark joins us to tell us about his experiences […]

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Understanding Art and Science with @ArthurIMiller

According to our guest, Einstein thought like an artist, and Picasso thought like a scientist.  As Professor emeritus of history and philosophy of science at University College London, Arthur I. Miller has been exploring the intersection of art and science.  His new book Colliding Worlds: How Cutting-Edge Science is Redefining Contemporary Art  tells the story of how art, science and technology […]

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Crowded Orbits: Understanding Satellites with Author Clay Moltz

As science educators, we are likely to recognize Sputnik as the first satellite in space.  But what has happened with satellites since Sputnik?  How many satellites are even out there, and how do we rely upon them?  To help answer some of these questions, we welcome Dr. James Clay Moltz to the show.  As author of Crowded Orbits, Dr. Moltz […]

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Teaching with @Interstellar: Our Conversation with Executive Producer Kip Thorne

To prepare for this episode, we had to do a little homework: see the movie Interstellar. As we were walking out of the theater, we knew we had to invite Kip Thorne back to the show.  As Feynman Professor of Theoretical Physics, Emeritus, at the California Institute of Technology, Kip Thorne is the scientific advisor and executive producer of Interstellar.  Listen to the […]

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Science Surprises: An eBook to Help Your Students Explore the Nature of Science

As webmaster for the ENSI (Evolution and the Nature of Sciences Institute) website, Larry Flammer has helped to provide a number of free, student-centered, interactive lessons focusing on the nature of science.  So Larry wrote Science Surprises: Exploring the Nature of Science – a text supplement available as an eBook that helps teach the nature of science, with lessons for […]

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Demos, Resources and Inspiration from @SteveSpangler

This week we turn our attention to science demonstrations.  And who better to talk about demos than Steve Spangler.  Famously known for his Mentos+Diet Coke experiment, Steve is an engaging and entertaining speaker, as well as a YouTube sensation.  Steve joins us to talk about how demonstrations can engage students, while promoting safety, fostering critical thinking and providing suggestions for science […]

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